Shish Kebaps

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Shish Kebaps www.compassandfork.comBeing an Australian, I take great interest in all things that can be cooked on a BBQ. Maybe it’s something that all males inherit as part of our genetic make up to provide food?

The great desire to cook raw meat over a fire is for me, one of life’s great pleasure. I’m sure that there is a more culturally significant description than this but who cares? All I know is that I love BBQ’s and so do most males that I know!

One of the very best forms of BBQ’ing is to cook skewered meat. There are many versions from many different cultures. Indian, Greek, Middle Eastern, Central Asian and Turkish. Now, of course, skewered meats are all over the world.

It is naturally a popular restaurant dish in Turkey. We had brilliant shish kebaps in Istanbul at a restaurant called Zubeyir Ocakbasi. It is highly rated and the lamb there was the best we tasted in Turkey. We were originally seated “at the bar” except that the bar was actually at the fireplace! It was way too hot but luckily they were able to seat us at a great table. We highly recommend that restaurant if you like meat but make a reservation.

Zubeyir shish kebaps www.compassandfork.com
Shish kebaps on the grill at Zubeyir

What I love about shish kebaps is that they can be eaten straight off a wooden skewer in a casual, stand up situation or as an elegant, sit down meal, resplendent metal skewer packed with meat (and maybe some veg). And people who don’t like dealing with bones love them too, as all the hard work has been done by the chef in the preparation of the skewers.

The Origin of Shish Kebaps

The term “Shish Kebap” (and often shortened to shish) is Turkish in origin and refers to cut up meat cooked on a metal skewer. There is ample evidence that the first known shish kebaps originated in the Eastern Mediterranean and the earliest known place was actually that magnificent Greek Island, Santorini, not far at all from Turkey. Archaeologists have uncovered cooking implements that indicate that shish was cooked as early as 1700 BC.

The traditional meat used in shish is lamb (cubes or minced). However, chicken, beef, fish and goat are also popular. In Turkey, we also ate some fantastic vegetarian versions, although you won’t see that here today!


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The Turkish-style shish kebap that we ate was not heavily spiced. It totally relies on the freshness and quality of the lamb. Note that we were primarily in the western half of Turkey where food is milder than the south east, where warmer spices are more the norm.

Cooking shish kepab with a side of eggplant
Cooking shish kepab with a side of eggplant

I have been cooking shish kebap for many years but one of the great things about travel is that you will always learn something new. There is a “secret sauce” used by the Turks to keep the lamb moist while it is cooking over the hot coals.

In addition to threading cubed meat onto the skewer, they also intersperse the meat with lamb fat. Yes sounds revolting but it’s not really. As the meat cooks, the fat bastes the meat, keeping the meat beautiful and moist. You discard the fat upon eating. How smart is that?

In Turkey and in Australia (at least) you can buy the lamb fat (called bunting). If you make your shish kebaps from leg of lamb, there will be pockets of fat. Don’t throw it away, use it on your shish!

Shish is quintessential, healthy, Mediterranean food. Serve it with some fresh pita bread, salad and yoghurt (or hummus) and you have the ultimate simple but healthy meal. Have a nice red or beer (or both) to accompany it and what else could you ask for?

Shish Kebaps www.compassandfork.com

More Great Turkish Recipes

Here are some more, great Turkish recipes:

Sultans Delight is one of the oldest-known recipes in the world. This lamb and smoky eggplant stew might be my favorite recipe. Great for a special occasion.

Turkish food is underrated. Try this Turkish stuffed eggplant dish and see for yourself how good Turkish food is!

Testi kebap is a meat (usually beef) and tomato-based stew that is often served in a clay pot. No clay pot required for this recipe!

Roast Chicken with Pilaf Stuffing. A riced-based stuffing for your next roast chicken recipe. A classic.

How to Make Authentic Turkish Shish Kebaps #kebap #Turkish #Meatrecipe #Lambrecipe #BBQ www.compassandfork.com
How to Cook Turkish Shish Kebaps #kebap #Turkish #Meatrecipe #Lambrecipe #BBQ www.compassandfork.com
Shish Kebaps
Shish Kebaps
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This is a very simple recipe. The lamb is marinated in olive oil and a small amount of salt. You can spice it up if you wish by adding black pepper and dried oregano to the marinade. If you can, it is best to cook over coals or charcoal for that smoky, char-grilled taste. In this recipe, the shish kebaps are accompanied by a Red Onion Salad. Grilled vegetables such as bell peppers (capsicums), eggplant and zucchini also go well with this dish if you prefer that over a salad. The shish kebaps can also be served on pita bread and hummus or baba ghanoush if preferred.
Servings Prep Time Cook Time Passive Time
4people 15minutes 15minutes 12-24hours
Servings Prep Time
4people 15minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
15minutes 12-24hours
Ingredients
Servings: people
Units:
Ingredients
Servings: people
Units:
Instructions
  1. In a bowl, combine the meat, bunting, olive oil and salt. Add the black pepper and oregano, if using. Stir, cover with wrap and refrigerate overnight. Remove from the refrigerator 1 hour before cooking.
  2. Prepare your charcoal grill a good hour in advance so that the coals are grey and hot when ready to cook.
  3. I prefer metal skewers but you can use wooden ones. If using wooden skewers, soak them for 30 minutes before assembling the shish kebaps.
  4. Assemble the shish kebaps. You want a baby onion at each end. In between you want to alternate 2 pieces of meat and 1 piece of bunting. Do this 2 or 3 times to fill the skewer. You want 4 skewers altogether.Shish kebaps ready to cook www.compassandfork.com
  5. Prepare the salad by combining all of the ingredients.Shish Kebaps www.compassandfork.com
  6. Prepare the garlic yogurt by combining the yogurt and finely chopped garlic. If you like garlic, add another clove or 2.
  7. Cook the shish kebaps over the charcoal grill, about 4 minutes each side, or as cooked to your liking. (Medium rare is good). Discard the lamb fat when cooked.Shish Kebaps www.compassandfork.com
  8. Assemble by smearing the pita bread with the garlic yogurt. Add the shish kebap, minus the skewer and the lamb fat. Wrap and add some salad.Shish Kebaps www.compassandfork.com
Recipe Notes

Lamb leg is the traditional meat for this dish.  In the US you can buy it at Costco or you can get it here.  Beef and lamb (minus the bunting) may also be used.

Bunting (fat from the lamb's tail) can be sourced from middle eastern butchers.  Lamb leg also contains a good deal of fat, so use this if you can't obtain bunting.

In Turkey, the normal marinade for this is just olive oil and salt.  I don't usually add the oregano and pepper.

If you can't find baby (pickling) onions, then chop a medium onion into 1/8ths.

For an authentic taste, use pul biber and/or sumac.  Use chilli flakes as an alternative.

Baba ghanoush or hummus also go well with this dish.

2 Responses

  1. Cindy (Vegetarian Mamma)
    | Reply

    Thanks for sharing these shish kebaps! I know my father in law would love them, sharing!

    • Editor
      |

      Good on you Cindy. Thanks for commenting even though you are vegetarian. Cheers….Mark

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